Tell The Storm How Big Your God Is

Tell The Storm How Big Your God Is

Fear can be debilitating. It can be downright paralyzing and I think that’s a good reason why our enemy uses it so often to deter us from following, or even seeking, after God at times.

Two stories in the Bible deal with fear, yet the two are drastically different in the building of character within the children of God.

First, take a gander at Mark 4:35-41,

“On that day, when evening had come, he said to them, ‘Let us go across to the other side.’ And leaving the crowd, they took him with them in the boat, just as he was. And other boats were with him. And a great windstorm arose, and the waves were breaking into the boat, so that the boat was already filling. But he was in the stern, asleep on the cushion. And they woke him and said to him, ‘Teacher, do you not care that we are perishing?’ And he awoke and rebuked the wind and said to the sea, ‘Peace! Be still!’ And the wind ceased, and there was a great calm. He said to them, ‘Why are you so afraid? Have you still no faith?’ And they were filled with great fear and said to one another, ‘Who then is this, that even the wind and the sea obey him?’

The disciples were focused on their situation, on the storm and the perception that Jesus did not care about whether they lived or died. The circumstances determined how they related to God and also how they viewed His power. They pleaded with Him for help and when He did calm the storm, they were fearful of Him still.

How many times do we approach God like this within our own lives? How often do we worry, doubt and fear about our circumstances?

Let’s look at the other story, found in 1 Samuel 17 (please read the passage in it’s entirety. I had to whittle it down for this post),

“And Saul and the men of Israel were gathered, and encamped in the Valley of Elah, and drew up in line of battle against the Philistines. And the Philistines stood on the mountain on the one side, and Israel stood on the mountain on the other side, with a valley between them. And there came out from the camp of the Philistines a champion named Goliath of Gath, whose height was six cubits and a span (over 9 ft tall)… He stood and shouted to the ranks of Israel, ‘Why have you come out to draw up for battle? Am I not a Philistine, and are you not servants of Saul? Choose a man for yourselves, and let him come down to me. If he is able to fight with me and kill me, then we will be your servants. But if I prevail against him and kill him, then you shall be our servants and serve us.’ And the Philistine said, ‘I defy the ranks of Israel this day. Give me a man, that we may fight together.’ When Saul and all Israel heard these words of the Philistine, they were dismayed and greatly afraid. (vs 2-4,8-11)
And David left the things in charge of the keeper of the baggage and ran to the ranks and went and greeted his brothers. As he talked with them, behold, the champion, the Philistine of Gath, Goliath by name, came up out of the ranks of the Philistines and spoke the same words as before. And David heard him. All the men of Israel, when they saw the man, fled from him and were much afraid. (vs 22-24)

And David said to the men who stood by him, ‘What shall be done for the man who kills this Philistine and takes away the reproach from Israel? For who is this uncircumcised Philistine, that he should defy the armies of the living God?’ (vs 26)

When the words that David spoke were heard, they repeated them before Saul, and he sent for him. And David said to Saul, ‘Let no man’s heart fail because of him. Your servant will go and fight with this Philistine.’ (vs 31-32)

“And David said, ‘The Lord who delivered me from the paw of the lion and from the paw of the bear will deliver me from the hand of this Philistine.’ And Saul said to David, ‘Go, and the Lord be with you!’ (vs 37)

And the Philistine moved forward and came near to David, with his shield-bearer in front of him. And when the Philistine looked and saw David, he disdained him, for he was but a youth, ruddy and handsome in appearance. And the Philistine said to David, ‘Am I a dog, that you come to me with sticks?’ And the Philistine cursed David by his gods. The Philistine said to David, ‘Come to me, and I will give your flesh to the birds of the air and to the beasts of the field.’

Then David said to the Philistine, ‘You come to me with a sword and with a spear and with a javelin, but I come to you in the name of the Lord of hosts, the God of the armies of Israel, whom you have defied. This day the Lord will deliver you into my hand, and I will strike you down and cut off your head. And I will give the dead bodies of the host of the Philistines this day to the birds of the air and to the wild beasts of the earth, that all the earth may know that there is a God in Israel, and that all this assembly may know that the Lord saves not with sword and spear. For the battle is the Lord’s, and he will give you into our hand.’

When the Philistine arose and came and drew near to meet David, David ran quickly toward the battle line to meet the Philistine. And David put his hand in his bag and took out a stone and slung it and struck the Philistine on his forehead. The stone sank into his forehead, and he fell on his face to the ground.So David prevailed over the Philistine with a sling and with a stone, and struck the Philistine and killed him. There was no sword in the hand of David. Then David ran and stood over the Philistine and took his sword and drew it out of its sheath and killed him and cut off his head with it. When the Philistines saw that their champion was dead, they fled.” (vs 41-51)

David approached the scenario an entirely different way.

Instead of being responsive to his circumstances, he was defensive of the children & character of God. His entire offense was in trusting that the Lord is faithful and that it is the Lord who will overcome the battle for him.

In both stories, God did work. He showed His power and overcame both situations. He took care of His people, even when they reacted in fear instead of trust. 

The difference between the two stories is the confidence and faith of the people God was with. David was strengthened by his faith, while the disciples’ hearts faltered in knowing they were in the presence of the One who controls even storms.

Don’t get me wrong, God wants us to be honest with Him and to lay our burdens before Him (1 Peter 5:6-11). But He wants us to trust Him more than fearing our situations. The epitome of this type of trust is found in Matthew 26:36-46 where Jesus, in the garden of Gethsemane, lays his troubles before His Father and yet still settles his heart to trust Him.

It is not a sin to be afraid. But what do you do with that fear? Do you exhibit your faith in the Almighty God who is good, who is with you, who knows your every need, and who overcomes battles for you?

Psalm 34 is a wonderful passage that exhibits the character and goodness of the Lord!

Let us not tell our God how big our storms are, instead let us tell our storms how great our God is.

Holly from The Brown Tribe

Holly currently lives in Nebraska with her amazing & godly husband, sweet & smart 4-year old daughter & joyful 2 year old son. She is a stay-at-home mom who serves with her local MOPS group, and on her church’s Mission Leadership Team for missionary support. She writes at The Brown Tribe for the purpose of discipling and encouraging women and mothers. She is also a contributor for Missional Call. In her spare time she enjoys coffee, photography, exploring the culinary craft, helping combat human trafficking through awareness and is currently writing her first book. You can follow along with Holly on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, google +,  and Instagram

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